Archive for the ‘Anorexia Symptoms’ Category

The Differences Between Anorexia And Bulimia

Friday, February 16th, 2007

The distinctions between eating disorders can be confusing. While anorexia and bulimia may have some issues in common, other factors make them distinct. For parents, understanding the differences can be crucial, as early detection and proper treatment significantly improve the chances a child will recover. Following is information to help distinguish between the two.

Definition:

Anorexia is more common in teenagers, while bulimia is more often seen in women in their 20’s. However, don’t make the mistake of thinking there is a set age for either of these diseases. Here are differences between anorexia and bulimia based on the American Psychiatric Association’s definition:

Bulimia Nervosa

•Recurrent episodes of binge eating (minimum average of two binge-eating episodes a week for at least three months).
•A feeling of lack of control over eating during the binges.
•Regular use of one or more of the following to prevent weight gain: self-induced vomiting, use of laxatives or diuretics, strict dieting or fasting, or vigorous exercise.
•Persistent over-concern with body shape and weight.

Anorexia Nervosa

•Refusal to maintain weight that’s over the lowest weight considered normal for age and height.
•Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, even though underweight.
•Distorted body image.
•In women, three consecutive missed menstrual periods without pregnancy.

Signs & Symptoms:

While both disorders focus on an obsession with thinness, anorexics display noticeable, often severe weight loss while bulimics usually maintain a healthy weight. Here are other signs and symptoms of these two eating disorders:

Anorexia
•Avoids eating
•Exercises excessively
•Weighs food and counts calories
•Wears baggy clothes
•Takes diet pills
•Has dry skin and thinning hair
•Has fine hair on other parts of body
•Acts moody or depressed
•Feels cold
•Has frequent sensation of dizziness

Bulimia
•Has a puffy face
•Exercises excessively
•Has swollen fingers
•Has cuts and calluses on the back of the hands and knuckles
•Discoloring or staining of teeth
•Goes to the bathroom a lot after eating (to purge)

Health Issues:
Both disorders can cause severe health issues. Bulimia damages the digestive system and can affect electrolyte balances, which in turn damages organs. The starvation of anorexia causes the body to slow down to preserve energy, which in turn has adverse consequences. In extreme cases, both can lead to death. Other health issues include:

Anorexia
•Reduction of bone density
•Cessation of menstrual periods
•Fatigue
•Depression
•Irregular heart rate, leading to possible heart failure
•Mild anemia
•Muscle loss
•Possible kidney failure due to dehydration
•Low blood pressure

Bulimia
•Possible rupture of the esophagus due to frequent vomiting
•Fatigue
•Depression
•Stomach pains
•Irregular heart rate, leading to possible heart failure
•Constipation
•Tooth decay from stomach acid

Treatment:
When seeking treatment, parents may find their child resists admitting they are ill. In dealing with a child suffering from an eating disorder, treatment for involves a team of specialists: doctors, dieticians, and therapists. Self-help groups and treatment centers are also effective. Following are treatment goals and options for anorexia and bulimia, based on recommendations from the National Institute of Mental Health:

Anorexia: The treatment of anorexia has three main phases:
•Restore weight loss
•Treat psychological issues such as depression, self-esteem, and interpersonal conflicts
•Achieve long-term recovery and remission

The use of anti-depressants for treating anorexia should be considered only after weight gain has been established.

Bulimia: The main goal in the treatment of bulimia is to eliminate binging and purging.
•Establish healthy and consistent eating habits, i.e. three meals a day at regular times
•Encourage healthy, not excessive, exercise
•Treat psychological issues such as mood or anxiety disorders

The use of anti-depressants for treating bulimia has been shown to be helpful for those with bulimia and may help prevent relapse.

About The Author

Rob Zawrotny is a copywriter for MWI web design. He has been assisting Avalon Hills Eating Disorder Treatment Center in developing content for those seeking information about Anorexia and Bulimia. Visit http://www.avalonhills.org for more information.

Eating Disorders: Anorexia and Bulimia

Thursday, February 15th, 2007

The incidences of eating disorders in our society have been steadily increasing over the last few years. It now occurs in 1 out of every 100 women. Nineteen out of 20 people who suffer from eating disorders are young women between 18 and 25.

Studies have found that our social habits and expectations increase the likelihood of the disorder in our young women. The emphasis on outward appearances and thinness are targeted daily through peer pressure and how our society markets its Health and Fitness Products and Services.

Yes obesity is definitely a problem in our society, and we have guidelines for Health and Nutrition, but the majority of young women fail to follow the guidelines in an effort to gain immediate gratification or have had abnormal eating habits throughout their lifetime.

Anorexia Nervosa:

Case Study:

Jennifer is 20 years old. She is very attractive and has always been an over achiever. From an early age she prided herself on her figure. She watched her diet, exercised daily and maintained a regiment of self-discipline. She has always been thin, but has never been satisfied with her weight or appearance. She continually strives to lose more weight. She is 5’ 6” and weighs 85 lbs.

Jennifer is unaware of the fact that she is undernourished, therefore she sees no problem with her appearance or weight.

How does this happen??

Learned behavior has a great deal to do with why this happens. Many young women develop anorexia-like patterns as our society is pressured with the pursuit of thinness. Many women are anorexic based on the eating patterns they have developed by trying to accomplish unrealistic weight goals.

Fashion models, long distance runners, women athletes and dancers commonly have anorexia-like traits.

  1. An intense fear of becoming obese. Even as they lose more weight.
  2. Inaccurate vision of how their bodies appear. Feeling fat when in actuality they are very thin and emaciated.
  3. Continual weight loss. 25% or more of their original body weight.
  4. Refusal to gain weight, which would place them in a normal body weight range.

Physical Dangers:

A rigorous dieting regime will send the body into starvation mode. Then the physical effects will start to manifest themselves:

Thyroid hormones will become abnormal. Adrenal, growth hormones and blood-pressure hormones also become abnormal.

Heart functions change. The heart pumps less efficiently, muscles become weak and thin. Heart rhythms many change. Blood pressure levels fall.

GI function can become abnormal. Diarrhea occurs as the lining of the digestive tract slow.

High levels of Vitamin A and Carotene in the blood.

Reduced levels of Protein.

An increase in fine body hair, skin dryness and deceased skin temperatures.

Brain activity becomes abnormal. Loss of sleep and feeling of never having enough rest.

Anorexia Nervosa is hard to diagnose, because almost everyone in our society is in pursuing thinness. Denial and deception are common place for young women with Anorexia, therefore it takes a skilled professional to diagnose Anorexia.

Bulimia

Bulimia occurs in women of all ages, but is more common among those under 30. Bulimia is more common than Anorexia and in males. Only a small percentage of people who are Bulimic show signs of Anorexia.

Case Study:

Carry is a women in her late twenties, she maintain a normal weight range and obsesses about food. She starves herself then binges, when she has eaten too much she vomits.

Carry, like 60% of people with Bulimia, starts to binge after a period of extreme dieting. The most popular binge foods are food that are high in sugar and fat, and are easy to eat in large amounts. (cookies, cakes, ice cream, and bread products)

The side effects of the binge eating are swollen hands and feet, bloating, fatigue, headaches, nausea and pain.

Physical Dangers:

Fluid and Electrolyte imbalances.

Abnormal Heart rhythms

Kidney dysfunction which can cause bladder infections and kidney failure.

Irritation to the pharynx, esophagus, and salivary glands.

Erosion of teeth and dental caries.

Use of laxatives can cause injury to the intestinal tract.

Bulimia has been described as a socially approved method of weight control. Practiced among women in the upper-classes because of social obligations which include many dinners and parties.

Both Anorexia and Bulimia are socially generated eating disorders generated by our need for the “perfect image”, resulting in self-destructive eating patterns.

Listen to your Body, it is Wiser than you Think. Respect your own unique traits and Diet sensibly.

Resources:

WebMD
http://my.webmd.com

Eating Disorder Treatment and Helpline
http://edhelpline.com

National Eating Disorders Association
http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org

Anorexia and Bulimia Care
http://www.anorexiabulimiacare.co.uk

This article is freely available for reprint provided that the resource box at the end of the article is left intact and the article is published complete.

About The Author
Written by Tina M. Rideout, For more information about Health and Fitness visit:
http://clean-living-nutritional-supplements.com
gworkp@yahoo.com

If You Have a Friend with Anorexia Nervosa

Tuesday, February 13th, 2007

It can be very difficult to discover that your friend has anorexia nervosa. It is often tricky to know how to react and what is the best way to approach the subject with them. But it is essential, especially for the newly diagnosed sufferer, that they should have the support and care of their friends so they do not feel alone. If you have no experience of conditions such as anorexia nervosa, hearing your friend recount how it affects them and how they feel about it can be very difficult and unsettling. But your help and support can be very beneficial to them in their fight against the disease. Often if someone has anorexia nervosa and has recently been you diagnosed, it can be very confusing for them. Although they will have realized that they are being careful and as they see it sensible, about their eating, it can come as a great shock when the diagnosis of anorexia nervosa is made. Even if they accept their anorexia nervosa, it does not always help. They can, if told that they will die if they carry on, just accept this and believe that it does not matter what they do as this is going to happen anyway and as such they might as well carry on with their “normal” way of doing things. Its important to realise this illness really does take control of your life which is wy its virtually imposible for somone that has it to get thrugh it themselves. It is essential that you do not reject them when you find out that they are ill. They need all the help and support that they can get, if they are going to beat the anorexia nervosa and get themselves back to a good state of health. People with anorexia nervosa can be very unreasonable some of the time and can say very hurtful things. Although this can be very difficult to cope with, it is worth bearing in mind that this is very often the disease talking. It is a good idea to see it in the perspective of your past friendship and realize that the person that you have had a long relationship with, has not suddenly taken a dislike to you and that they are being affected by their illness. The best way that you can help them, is to remain their friend and give them all the support that you can.

Mayoor Patel has published a best selling book on “The Truth about Anorexia” which can be found at my website which can be found here http://www.BeatAnorexiaNow.com/

Discover and Help Anorexic People By Learning Anorexia Symptoms

Saturday, February 3rd, 2007
Anorexia nervosa is primarily a psychiatric disease, but which has negative effects on the body and can lead to serious problems, even death through starvation in extreme cases when it is not treated. It is a modern-day disease caused by society in general and the fact that nowadays slim is considered beautiful, so, many women, especially the young ones (and sometimes men) refuse to eat and start having eating disorders and lose serious weight. Stress and pressure contribute to the disease’s development.

People suffering from anorexia become thinner each day but to them it’s never enough so they try to get even more thinner which leads to serious physiological problems. They tend to stay away from socialization, because they feel that they are not thin enough and therefore rejected by society and they deny the fact that they are suffering from anything.

Treatment of anorexia nervosa can only be done with the help of family and friends, and it is hard to do because the ill person does not admit that he/she suffers from anything. But, before the treatment the disease must be discovered, and because anorexic people aren’t aware of their condition a diagnose can only be put by someone else who realizes that someone close to him is anorexic. Remember that an anorexic will never come to a doctor alone so it’s up to you to help. Therefore, you should know what are the symptoms of anorexia so that you can detect it and help whomever you discover to be suffering from it.

The first thing that should draw your attention and make you suspicious is that anorexic people suddenly start to loose a lot of weight and they become too thin. If you see that one of your friends has gotten too thin but still tries to lose more weight than that person may have anorexia. This is the basic symptom, that gives the first alarm signal. Afterwards, try to see if that person does a lot of physical exercises. Anorexics keep doing physical exercises to lose weight although they have lost too much already. And they are also obsessed with losing more weight so this is the main thing that they are talking about, diets and weight-losing.

You may also check for other physical symptoms of the illness. For example, women who are suffering from anorexia don’t have a period anymore, which has severe consequences over their body. This may be harder to detect in some cases. The sensitivity to lower temperatures decreases at anorexic people so they may feel cold when the room is cool. Insomnia, mood swings, dry skin, hair problems (either loss of hair, either an increase in body hair may occur, depending on the patient) and finally constipation are characteristic to someone suffering from anorexia. Anorexia also has less visible symptoms like osteoporosis and low blood pressure.

So if you discover that one of the people you know are suffering from this illness seek advice from a doctor as soon as you can until things get worse. Treatment is difficult and long, so the illness must be discovered as soon as possible.

If you want to find great information about many anorexia subjects like pro anorexia, girls with anorexia or many more please visit us at http://www.anorexia-center.com .