Archive for the ‘Anorexia Nervosa Diagnosis’ Category

Little Known Facts on The Importance of Self Image

Sunday, March 11th, 2007

It is not a surprise to most people that health studies point to
popular culture as a perpetrator of body image which has
corresponded to the self image and well being of women AND men.
What may surprise you is that this is not a new phenomenon.
Is the rail thin appearance of runway and magazine models a new
obsession which has started young girls and women on a path
towards starvation, malnutrition and disorders such as anorexia
and bulimia?
Actually, No.
The western world created a popular culture of ‘you can never be
to thin’ as early as the 20’s when flapper styles caused women to
starve and over exercise their bodies to attain the flat chested,
androgynous look that was popular at that time.
The fuller figure did make a comeback during the depression, but
quickly reverted in the 60’s with thinness being equated with
physical beauty.
Studies on self image indicate that women tend to consider
themselves heavier than they really are. This distorted body
image is linked to unhealthy dietary practices like anorexia and
bulimia.
Although distorted body image affects men and women of all age
ranges, it is middle and upper class women who are most commonly
affected in thinking they are too heavy and need to loose weight.
Girls as young as nine are following the paths set down by
mothers, sisters and others.
On the other hand, men with body image problems often feel they
are too thin and use of steroids by youths trying to build muscle
mass shows that they are also adversely affected by media
portrayals of the body.
Bad self image is learned. This can be clearly illustrated by a
study conducted by WHO with Canadian students. The study showed
that the confidence of children dropped dramatically through the
pre-teen years. The percentage of 11 year old boys and girls who
felt confident all of the time was 47% and 35% respectively. By
age 15 the percentage dropped to 30% for boys and a disappointing
14% for girls.
What are we teaching our children?
In a quote from Health Canada based on a research program for
VITALITY the following report was made: “Slimness in western
cultures is associated not only with success and sophistication,
but with character virtues. Conversely, obesity is the opposite
of all these things and, particularly in the case of women, is
associated with failure and a collapse of self-discipline.”
Self image is tied to several factors, only one of which is body
image. Self image is part of self awareness and starts early in
childhood, even before speech. As we become adults many tie their
self image to such factors as job success, relationships and
abilities. Body image – if a person has a negative view of
themselves physically – can be one of the most dramatic
influences.
Health Canada’s findings show that although self image may be
subject to change throughout our life, our “fundamental sense of
feeling worthy or unworthy (self-esteem) remains relatively
stable”. This means that it is while children are still young
that the most impact is made on their future self image. Creating
a safe, nurturing and loving environment can be the greatest
protection against negative body image and low self-esteem.
The information contained in this article is for educational purposes
only and is not intended to medically diagnose, treat or cure any
disease. Consult a health care practitioner before beginning any
health care program.

About the Author

Emily Clark is editor at Lifestyle Health News and Medical Health News where you can find the most up-to-date advice and information on many medical, health and lifestyle topics.

Bulimia affected Teens

Friday, March 9th, 2007

Bulimia is an eating disorder that mostly affects young women of 12. Characteristics of bulimia include episodic binge eating followed by feelings of guilt and self-condemnation. Bulimia can actually damage a person’s stomach and kidneys as a result of constant vomiting. Bulimia can also cause a person’s teeth to decay because of the acids that come up into the mouth while vomiting. Teens suffering from bulimia often show signs of the eating disorder by eating a large amount of food in a small time frame and immediately purging themselves of the food ingested by causing themselves to vomit.

Difference between Bulimia and Anorexia:
Bulimia is a bit different from anorexia because the person with bulimia doesn’t avoid eating. Instead, he or she eats a large amount of food then gets rid of it quickly by vomiting or taking laxatives. Like anorexia, bulimia tends to affect girls and young women more than guys. A teen that is bulimic can have some of the same symptoms as an anorexic, but she may not lose much weight and may actually appear healthy.

Symptoms of Bulimia:

Makes excuses to go to the bathroom immediately after meals
Eats huge amounts of food, but doesn’t gain weight
Uses laxatives or diuretics
Withdraws from social activities

Prevention of Bulimia:

There are the few steps that parents, teachers, coaches and others who work with teens can take to help avoid bulimia. Tips are:

· Modifying and adapting expectations you have of your teen.
· Examining your own perceptions and attitudes towards food, body image, physical appearance and exercise.
· Do not give off the message that you cannot do activities such as dance, swim, or wear certain types of clothing because of the way you look or how much you weigh.
· Encourage eating in response to physical hunger.
· Encourage eating a variety of foods.
· Help teens to appreciate their bodies and encourage them to engage in physical activity.
· Do not use food as a reward or punishment.
· Do not criticize your own weight or the way you look by avoiding the use of such phrases as “I’m too fat” or “I’ve got to lose weight.”
· Love, accept, and acknowledge the teen’s value verbally.

Treatment for teens suffering from bulimia has been advancing in recent years. There are the few web sites that are very useful for you:

http://www.troubledteensguide.com

http://www.troubled-teens.biz

The sites help you to understand effective communication, and then show you how to overcome your specific problems and in the best possible way. It specifically designed to support the parents of Troubled Teens. The purpose of communication is to get your message across to others clearly. Their services are devoted to the parent who is overwhelmed and in need of immediate assistance (coaching) in order to locate the perfect troubled teen school or program for their child. Troubled teens guide is a listing of articles specifically designed to support the parents of Troubled Teens. It provides them proper guidance about teen’s problems and in the process save the parent time, energy, and thousands of dollars.

About Author: Monica Craft
For listings please visit http://www.troubledteensguide.com Resource for Troubled Teens and you can also visit http://www.troubled-teens.biz/ for Teenage Problems .

Eating Disorders in Teens

Monday, March 5th, 2007

According to a survey eating disorders most often affect young women. Less than 10% of people with eating disorders are boys and men. Eating disorders affect a person’s physical and emotional health. They are very dangerous illnesses and can be fatal if they are not treated.

Eating disorder is a condition when teen refused to eat and gain in weight. Eating disorders are a harrowing addiction — affecting teens physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. These disorders are characterized by a preoccupation with food and a distortion of body image. There are two common types of eating disorders are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa.

People affected with anorexia have an intense of being fatty. A person with anorexia may weigh food before eating it or compulsively count the calories of everything. The key elements of anorexia nervosa are losing weight below a normal weight. While people affected with bulimia, eats a large amount of food then gets rid of it quickly by vomiting or taking laxatives. People feel guilty and anxious and then they want to get rid of food by vomiting or by exercising.

Symptoms There are so many signs of eating disorder that are given below

Refusing to eat
Eating in secret
Distorted body image
Large changes in weight, both up and down
Hiding weight loss by wearing bulky clothes
Hoarding and hiding food
Muscle weakness
Disappearing after eating—often to the bathroom
Depression
Dizziness
Feeling cold all the time
Irritability
Sleep problems
Thinning of hair on head, dry and brittle hair
Muscle weakness
Dizziness
Feeling cold all the time
Sleep problems

Causes

Eating disorders are often associated with feelings of helplessness, sadness, anxiety, and the need to be perfect. This can cause a person to use dieting or weight loss to provide a sense of control or stability. The one other main reason is magazines, movies, and the tobacco industry promotes unrealistic role models for beauty and weight. So teens started Dieting to reduce their weight. It is not effective but harmful.

Eating Disorder Treatment

There is no proper treatment for the eating disorder; family therapy is one of the keys to eating healthily again. The main problem is to recognize this. They may be secretive about their eating habits so that even their family and friends are not aware that they have a problem. Eating disorder will not disappear overnight like many people wish for. Parents and other family members are important in helping a person see that his or her normal body shape is perfectly fine and that being thin doesn’t make anyone happy.

It takes a joint effort between parents and their son or daughter to fight this eating disorder (overweight). The doctor may recommend that a person stay in the hospital for a few days if the medical condition is unstable or dangerous.

http://www.troubled-teens.biz/

http://www.restoretroubledteens.com/
The sites help you to understand effective communication, and then show you how to communicate your message in the best possible way. After completing this section, you should have a better understanding of how to communicate effectively – to individuals and groups, via spoken communications, written communications, electronic communications and even communication with elders. The purpose of communication is to get your message across to others clearly

Troubled Teen Biz provides valuable resources for parenting. Like for boot camps, wilderness programs, group homes, rehabs and boarding schools for their troubled teen.

About Author: Nivea David
For listings please visit http://www.restoretroubledteens.com/ for Struggling Troubled Teens . You can also visit . http://www.troubled-teens.biz/ for Troubled Teenagers Help.

Anorexia – a Game of Control!

Friday, February 23rd, 2007

This article will help you see what lies behind the eating disorder called Anorexia Nervosa, giving Anorexia tips. Low self-esteem produces a game of control. It causes a person to suffer in silence – suffering that can lead to anorexia.

Do you struggle with painful feelings about yourself, as a person? We can have so much in our western world, but lack the one thing we most desire – acceptance and a feeling of self worth!

Tania was a beautiful teenage girl. She was given compliments, but felt unable to accept them. Her distorted image of her body led her to become anorexic. This article is not primarily about the signs and symptoms of anorexia. It’s purpose is to help the reader discover what lies behind the eating disorder called anorexia nervosa.

First of all, we need to understand how low self-esteem and anorexia are related.

The Link Between Low Self-esteem and Anorexia

A sense of low self-esteem can be caused through inadequate nurturing as a result of emotional, physical or sexual abuse as a child. Abuse is when a person uses their power or position to force another person to perform in order to meet their needs.

Emotional abuse is the subtlest form of abuse. Most of us at some time or other, whether to a greater or lesser degree, have been victims of emotional abuse. It could come from anyone who has a position of authority who requires you to perform in order to have his or her needs met.

Tania was a victim of emotional abuse. Her self-rejection grew as her parents were not able to meet her emotional needs even though she lacked nothing materially.

Emotional abuse usually begins as a generational problem. Tania’s parents did not know how to meet her needs as they themselves had unmet needs. They were what we call an ‘adult child’, searching for someone to nurture them and fulfil their needs.

Tania sensed these needs and subconsciously sought to fulfil them by ‘being there’ for her parents. As opposed to the adults ‘being there’ to meet her emotional needs! Tania listened as her parents shared their challenges but neither of them were able to spend quality time with her to allow her to open up and share her concerns. Tania had a false sense of security because she felt needed, but lacked someone to care for her own needs. This left her feeling abandoned and abused because she was not being affirmed.

As Tania did not have her own emotional needs met she was left with feelings of low self-worth, emptiness, loneliness, self-hate and depression. To compensate for her feelings of low self-worth she grew up putting more emphasis on `doing’ rather than being’. This set the scene for Tania to become anorexic!

Can you relate to Tania in some way? Do you feel empty inside wishing someone would meet your inner needs? Keep reading and you will discover how you can become all you can be.

Low Self-Esteem Is the Root of All Addictions- Including Anorexia Nervosa

It has been said that addictions are an attempt to hide the real ‘me’ from the outside world. Addictions can come in many forms to help you feel better, change your mood and avoid painful feelings. In an attempt to avoid pain one can subtly be led into deception, lies and denial. Anorexia Nervosa was Tania’s way of changing her perception of herself – her intense, irrational fear of being fat kept her in a cycle of deception and control. Let’s look at how this cycle works.

Low Self-Esteem Produces A Game of Control

Those with low self-worth often convey a sense of control. To avoid others seeing the real person, and in fear of falling victim again, they may either control others by being assertive, or control themselves by being non-assertive.

Tania’s mother’s commented to me that from her perspective she felt Tania used her eating disorder to control and manipulate her. It was like Tania was, consciously or subconsciously, trying to control both herself and her mother.

The Non-assertive Approach of Control

The person with a non-assertive approach sees self-worth as being based on what people think about himself/herself: it is important at any cost to gain the approval of others. Sufferers of anorexia go to extreme lengths to achieve their goal of acceptance.

It is important to note that in endeavouring to deal with low self-worth, a person can swing from being non-assertive to assertive, or visa versa. One can start out as an assertive achiever, as we will discuss in the next section, and swing to become a non-assertive, non-achiever or “loser”.

The non-assertive approach produces a cycle, which begins with denial and a desire to please because of fear of rejection. These people become resentful and angry with themselves and others when their goal is not achieved, which leads to depression and increased feelings of rejection of self or others. Then in order to feel better about themselves, they begin the cycle of control again.

The Assertive Approach of Control

The person with an assertive approach strives to feel good about himself/herself by meeting certain standards. Feelings of never doing well enough or being good enough can create a fear of failure, which results in both a drive for perfectionism and control of self and others.

Life becomes a problem to be solved for anorexia nervosa sufferers. They are constantly caught up in ‘doing’ rather than ‘being’ content, restful and enjoying life. If you have feelings of never doing well enough or being good enough you will know what I mean!

The perfectionist has inflexible rules on how people should act or think. Deep down, it is felt that self-value is only obtained through achievement; therefore new challenges or other people’s opinions are threatening, as the perfectionist feels that mistakes are to be avoided at any cost to prevent shame.

The assertive approach also produces a cycle, which begins with denial and a desire to control self and others through fear of failure. To achieve this goal the assertive person is legalistic and critical of self and others. These people become defensive and angry when their goal is not achieved, which leads to feelings of loneliness and depression. To feel better about themselves they begin the cycle of control again to achieve their goal.

Life becomes a game of control! How do we get out of this cycle we get ourselves into through low self-worth?

For all who struggle with low self-esteem, I invite you to visit our website (www.ydyc.org) and see a cartoon presentation that will give you hope and freedom from the cycle of deception and control. It will help you make a fresh start and become all you can be.

As a trained nurse I strongly recommend that you seek professional help if you are suffering from anorexia nervosa.

About The Author
Wilma Watson

Trained nurse, author, and speaker, Wilma Watson has been helping people overcome life’s challenges for over 35 years. Her encouraging words have helped thousands reach their full potential. Wilma is the producer of a unique website that makes spirituality fun and simple. Visit her site at www.ydyc.org.

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Eating Disorders: Facts About Eating Disorders and the Search for Solutions

Sunday, February 18th, 2007

Eating is controlled by many factors, including appetite, food availability, family, peer, and cultural practices, and attempts at voluntary control. Dieting to a body weight leaner than needed for health is highly promoted by current fashion trends, sales campaigns for special foods, and in some activities and professions. Eating disorders involve serious disturbances in eating behavior, such as extreme and unhealthy reduction of food intake or severe overeating, as well as feelings of distress or extreme concern about body shape or weight. Researchers are investigating how and why initially voluntary behaviors, such as eating smaller or larger amounts of food than usual, at some point move beyond control in some people and develop into an eating disorder. Studies on the basic biology of appetite control and its alteration by prolonged overeating or starvation have uncovered enormous complexity, but in the long run have the potential to lead to new pharmacologic treatments for eating disorders.

Eating disorders are not due to a failure of will or behavior; rather, they are real, treatable medical illnesses in which certain maladaptive patterns of eating take on a life of their own. The main types of eating disorders are anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. A third type, binge-eating disorder, has been suggested but has not yet been approved as a formal psychiatric diagnosis. Eating disorders frequently develop during adolescence or early adulthood, but some reports indicate their onset can occur during childhood or later in adulthood.

Eating disorders frequently co-occur with other psychiatric disorders such as depression, substance abuse, and anxiety disorders. In addition, people who suffer from eating disorders can experience a wide range of physical health complications, including serious heart conditions and kidney failure which may lead to death. Recognition of eating disorders as real and treatable diseases, therefore, is critically important.

Females are much more likely than males to develop an eating disorder. Only an estimated 5 to 15 percent of people with anorexia or bulimia and an estimated 35 percent of those with binge-eating disorder are male.

Anorexia Nervosa

An estimated 0.5 to 3.7 percent of females suffer from anorexia nervosa in their lifetime. Symptoms of anorexia nervosa include:

• Resistance to maintaining body weight at or above a minimally normal weight for age and height

• Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, even though underweight

• Disturbance in the way in which one’s body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape on self-evaluation, or denial of the seriousness of the current low body weight

• Infrequent or absent menstrual periods (in females who have reached puberty)

People with this disorder see themselves as overweight even though they are dangerously thin. The process of eating becomes an obsession. Unusual eating habits develop, such as avoiding food and meals, picking out a few foods and eating these in small quantities, or carefully weighing and portioning food. People with anorexia may repeatedly check their body weight, and many engage in other techniques to control their weight, such as intense and compulsive exercise, or purging by means of vomiting and abuse of laxatives, enemas, and diuretics. Girls with anorexia often experience a delayed onset of their first menstrual period.

The course and outcome of anorexia nervosa vary across individuals: some fully recover after a single episode; some have a fluctuating pattern of weight gain and relapse; and others experience a chronically deteriorating course of illness over many years. The mortality rate among people with anorexia has been estimated at 0.56 percent per year, or approximately 5.6 percent per decade, which is about 12 times higher than the annual death rate due to all causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. The most common causes of death are complications of the disorder, such as cardiac arrest or electrolyte imbalance, and suicide.

Bulimia Nervosa

An estimated 1.1 percent to 4.2 percent of females have bulimia nervosa in their lifetime. Symptoms of bulimia nervosa include:

• Recurrent episodes of binge eating, characterized by eating an excessive amount of food within a discrete period of time and by a sense of lack of control over eating during the episode

• Recurrent inappropriate compensatory behavior in order to prevent weight gain, such as self-induced vomiting or misuse of laxatives, diuretics, enemas, or other medications (purging); fasting; or excessive exercise

• The binge eating and inappropriate compensatory behaviors both occur, on average, at least twice a week for 3 months

• Self-evaluation is unduly influenced by body shape and weight

Because purging or other compensatory behavior follows the binge-eating episodes, people with bulimia usually weigh within the normal range for their age and height. However, like individuals with anorexia, they may fear gaining weight, desire to lose weight, and feel intensely dissatisfied with their bodies. People with bulimia often perform the behaviors in secrecy, feeling disgusted and ashamed when they binge, yet relieved once they purge.

Binge-Eating Disorder

Community surveys have estimated that between 2 percent and 5 percent of Americans experience binge-eating disorder in a 6-month period. Symptoms of binge-eating disorder include:

• Recurrent episodes of binge eating, characterized by eating an excessive amount of food within a discrete period of time and by a sense of lack of control over eating during the episode

• The binge-eating episodes are associated with at least 3 of the following: eating much more rapidly than normal; eating until feeling uncomfortably full; eating large amounts of food when not feeling physically hungry; eating alone because of being embarrassed by how much one is eating; feeling disgusted with oneself, depressed, or very guilty after overeating

• Marked distress about the binge-eating behavior

• The binge eating occurs, on average, at least 2 days a week for 6 months

• The binge eating is not associated with the regular use of inappropriate compensatory behaviors (e.g., purging, fasting, excessive exercise)

People with binge-eating disorder experience frequent episodes of out-of-control eating, with the same binge-eating symptoms as those with bulimia. The main difference is that individuals with binge-eating disorder do not purge their bodies of excess calories. Therefore, many with the disorder are overweight for their age and height. Feelings of self-disgust and shame associated with this illness can lead to bingeing again, creating a cycle of binge eating.

Treatment Strategies

Eating disorders can be treated and a healthy weight restored. The sooner these disorders are diagnosed and treated, the better the outcomes are likely to be. Because of their complexity, eating disorders require a comprehensive treatment plan involving medical care and monitoring, psychosocial interventions, nutritional counseling and, when appropriate, medication management. At the time of diagnosis, the clinician must determine whether the person is in immediate danger and requires hospitalization.

Treatment of anorexia calls for a specific program that involves three main phases: (1) restoring weight lost to severe dieting and purging; (2) treating psychological disturbances such as distortion of body image, low self-esteem, and interpersonal conflicts; and (3) achieving long-term remission and rehabilitation, or full recovery. Early diagnosis and treatment increases the treatment success rate. Use of psychotropic medication in people with anorexia should be considered only after weight gain has been established. Certain selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs ) have been shown to be helpful for weight maintenance and for resolving mood and anxiety symptoms associated with anorexia.

The acute management of severe weight loss is usually provided in an inpatient hospital setting, where feeding plans address the person’s medical and nutritional needs. In some cases, intravenous feeding is recommended. Once malnutrition has been corrected and weight gain has begun, psychotherapy (often cognitive-behavioral or interpersonal psychotherapy) can help people with anorexia overcome low self-esteem and address distorted thought and behavior patterns. Families are sometimes included in the therapeutic process.

The primary goal of treatment for bulimia is to reduce or eliminate binge eating and purging behavior. To this end, nutritional rehabilitation, psychosocial intervention, and medication management strategies are often employed. Establishment of a pattern of regular, non-binge meals, improvement of attitudes related to the eating disorder, encouragement of healthy but not excessive exercise, and resolution of co-occurring conditions such as mood or anxiety disorders are among the specific aims of these strategies. Individual psychotherapy (especially cognitive-behavioral or interpersonal psychotherapy), group psychotherapy that uses a cognitive-behavioral approach, and family or marital therapy have been reported to be effective. Psychotropic medications, primarily antidepressants such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs ), have been found helpful for people with bulimia, particularly those with significant symptoms of depression or anxiety, or those who have not responded adequately to psychosocial treatment alone. These medications also may help prevent relapse. The treatment goals and strategies for binge-eating disorder are similar to those for bulimia, and studies are currently evaluating the effectiveness of various interventions.

People with eating disorders often do not recognize or admit that they are ill. As a result, they may strongly resist getting and staying in treatment. Family members or other trusted individuals can be helpful in ensuring that the person with an eating disorder receives needed care and rehabilitation. For some people, treatment may be long term.

Research Findings and Directions

Research is contributing to advances in the understanding and treatment of eating disorders.

• NIMH-funded scientists and others continue to investigate the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions, medications, and the combination of these treatments with the goal of improving outcomes for people with eating disorders.

• Research on interrupting the binge-eating cycle has shown that once a structured pattern of eating is established, the person experiences less hunger, less deprivation, and a reduction in negative feelings about food and eating. The two factors that increase the likelihood of bingeing—hunger and negative feelings—are reduced, which decreases the frequency of binges.

• Several family and twin studies are suggestive of a high heritability of anorexia and bulimia, and researchers are searching for genes that confer susceptibility to these disorders. Scientists suspect that multiple genes may interact with environmental and other factors to increase the risk of developing these illnesses. Identification of susceptibility genes will permit the development of improved treatments for eating disorders.

• Other studies are investigating the neurobiology of emotional and social behavior relevant to eating disorders and the neuroscience of feeding behavior.

• Scientists have learned that both appetite and energy expenditure are regulated by a highly complex network of nerve cells and molecular messengers called neuropeptides . These and future discoveries will provide potential targets for the development of new pharmacologic treatments for eating disorders.

• Further insight is likely to come from studying the role of gonadal steroids. Their relevance to eating disorders is suggested by the clear gender effect in the risk for these disorders, their emergence at puberty or soon after, and the increased risk for eating disorders among girls with early onset of menstruation

Anorexia Nervosa

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Anorexia Nervosa is a serious, potentially life-threatening eating disorder characterized by self-starvation and excessive weight loss.

Anorexia Nervosa has four primary symptoms:

Resistance to maintaining body weight at or above a minimally normal weight for age and height

Intense fear of weight gain or being “fat” even though underweight.

Disturbance in the experience of body weight or shape, undue influence of weight or shape on self-evaluation, or denial of the seriousness of low body weight.

Loss of menstrual periods in girls and women post-puberty.

Eating disorders experts have found that prompt intensive treatment significantly improves the chances of recovery. Therefore, it is important to be aware of some of the warning signs of anorexia nervosa.

Warning Signs of Anorexia Nervosa:

Dramatic weight loss.

Preoccupation with weight, food, calories, fat grams, and dieting.

Refusal to eat certain foods, progressing to restrictions against whole categories of food (e.g. no carbohydrates, etc.).

Frequent comments about feeling “fat” or overweight despite weight loss.

Anxiety about gaining weight or being “fat.”

Denial of hunger.

Development of food rituals (e.g. eating foods in certain orders, excessive chewing, rearranging food on a plate).

Consistent excuses to avoid mealtimes or situations involving food.

Excessive, rigid exercise regimen–despite weather, fatigue, illness, or injury–the need to “burn off” calories taken in.

Withdrawal from usual friends and activities.

In general, behaviors and attitudes indicating that weight loss, dieting, and control of food are becoming primary concerns.

Anorexia nervosa involves self-starvation. The body is denied the essential nutrients it needs to function normally, so it is forced to slow down all of its processes to conserve energy. This “slowing down” can have serious medical consequences.

Health Consequences of Anorexia Nervosa:

Abnormally slow heart rate and low blood pressure, which mean that the heart muscle is changing. The risk for heart failure rises as heart rate and blood pressure levels sink lower and lower.

Reduction of bone density (osteoporosis), which results in dry, brittle bones.

Muscle loss and weakness.

Severe dehydration, which can result in kidney failure.

Fainting, fatigue, and overall weakness.

Dry hair and skin, hair loss is common.

Growth of a downy layer of hair called lanugo all over the body, including the face, in an effort to keep the body warm.

Statistics About Anorexia Nervosa:

Approximately 90-95% of anorexia nervosa sufferers are girls and women (American Psychiatric Association, 1994).

Between 0.5-1% of American women suffer from anorexia nervosa.

Anorexia nervosa is one of the most common psychiatric diagnoses in young women (Hsu, 1996).

Between 5-20% of individuals struggling with anorexia nervosa will die. The probabilities of death increases within that range depending on the length of the condition ( Zerbe, 1995).

Anorexia nervosa has one of the highest death rates of any mental health condition.

Anorexia nervosa typically appears in early to mid-adolescence.

Anorexia Nervosa in Males

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Anorexia nervosa is a severe, life-threatening disorder in which the individual refuses to maintain a minimally normal body weight, is intensely afraid of gaining weight, and exhibits a significant distortion in the perception of the shape or size of his body, as well as dissatisfaction with his body shape and size.

Behavioral Characteristics:

• Excessive dieting, fasting, restricted diet
• Food rituals
• Preoccupation with body building, weight lifting, or muscle toning
• Compulsive exercise
• Difficulty eating with others, lying about eating
• Frequently weighing self
• Preoccupation with food
• Focus on certain body parts; e.g., buttocks, thighs, stomach
• Disgust with body size or shape
• Distortion of body size; i.e., feels fat even though others tell him he is already very thin

Emotional and Mental Characteristics:

• Intense fear of becoming fat or gaining weight
• Depression
• Social isolation
• Strong need to be in control
• Rigid, inflexible thinking, “all or nothing”
• Decreased interest in sex or fears around sex
• Possible conflict over gender identity or sexual orientation
• Low sense of self worth — uses weight as a measure of worth
• Difficulty expressing feelings
• Perfectionistic — strives to be the neatest, thinnest, smartest, etc.
• Difficulty thinking clearly or concentrating
• Irritability, denial — believes others are overreacting to his low weight or caloric restriction
• Insomnia

Physical Characteristics:

• Low body weight (15% or more below what is expected for age, height, activity level)
• Lack of energy, fatigue
• Muscular weakness
• Decreased balance, unsteady gait
• Lowered body temperature, blood pressure, pulse rate
• Tingling in hands and feet
• Thinning hair or hair loss
• Lanugo (downy growth of body hair)
• Heart arrhythmia
• Lowered testosterone levels

Anorexia, Bulimia, & Binge Eating Disorder:

What is an Eating Disorder?

——————————————-

Eating Disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder include extreme emotions, attitudes, and behaviors surrounding weight and food issues.

They are serious emotional and physical problems that can have life-threatening consequences for females and males.

ANOREXIA NERVOSA is characterized by self-starvation and excessive weight loss.

Symptoms include:

• Refusal to maintain body weight at or above a minimally normal weight for height, body type, age, and activity level

• Intense fear of weight gain or being “fat”

• Feeling “fat” or overweight despite dramatic weight loss

• Loss of menstrual periods

Extreme concern with body weight and shape BULIMIA NERVOSA is characterized by a secretive cycle of binge eating followed by purging. Bulimia includes eating large amounts of food–more than most people would eat in one meal–in short periods of time, then getting rid of the food and calories through vomiting, laxative abuse, or over-exercising.

Symptoms include:

• Repeated episodes of bingeing and purging

• Feeling out of control during a binge and eating beyond the point of comfortable fullness

• Purging after a binge, (typically by self-induced vomiting, abuse of laxatives, diet pills and/or diuretics, excessive exercise, or fasting)

• Frequent dieting

Extreme concern with body weight and shape BINGE EATING DISORDER (also known as COMPULSIVE OVEREATING) is characterized primarily by periods of uncontrolled, impulsive, or continuous eating beyond the point of feeling comfortably full. While there is no purging, there may be sporadic fasts or repetitive diets and often feelings of shame or self-hatred after a binge. People who overeat compulsively may struggle with anxiety, depression, and loneliness, which can contribute to their unhealthy episodes of binge eating. Body weight may vary from normal to mild, moderate, or severe obesity.

OTHER EATING DISORDERS can include some combination of the signs and symptoms of anorexia, bulimia, and/or binge eating disorder. While these behaviors may not be clinically considered a full syndrome eating disorder, they can still be physically dangerous and emotionally draining. All eating disorders require professional help.

About The Author
Listen to Arthur Buchanan on the Mike Litman Show!
http://freesuccessaudios.com/Artlive.mp3 THIS LINK WORKS, LISTEN TODAY!

With Much Love,
Arthur Buchanan
President/CEO
Out of Darkness & Into the Light
43 Oakwood Ave. Suite 1012
Huron Ohio, 44839
www.out-of-darkness.com
www.adhdandme.com
www.biologicalhappiness.com
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arthur@out-of-darkness.com

Eating Disorders: What Exactly Are They?

Saturday, February 17th, 2007

Eating disorders are the diseases caused due to the abnormal eating behavior of an individual. Many people suffer from such eating disorders. They indulge in eating more and more food, which is considered abnormal. A normal person cannot have the amount of food, a person suffering from an eating disorder can have.

Such abnormal patterns of food are not a result of increased hunger. Person having eating disorders have other problems. These problems are related to their lifestyle. Eating disorders are a sign of a problematic time in a person’s life. People eat more food to suppress extreme emotions and depression.

There are also different types of eating disorders. Some types of eating disorders are: anorexia, compulsive eating, binge eating disorder and bulimia. These eating disorders are completely curable. You have to detect them on time and seek a medical advice. Treatment may takes a long time. But if the patient is given good support by his family and friends, he can fully overcome the disease.

There are certain misconception about eating disorders. One common misconception is that the males who have any eating disorder are considered to be gay. The fact is that sex has nothing to do with eating disorders. Secondly, if a man has one eating disorder, he cannot have another. Whereas, many people have multiple eating disorders.

The most common misbelieve is that teenage girls are more prone to eating disorders. It is a fact that you can have an eating disorder during your teenage years but anyone, be it children, young girls, and boys, can develop an eating disorder.

If someone around you seems to be suffering with eating disorders, help them. Such people become emotionally very weak and use food as a way to relieve themselves. Emotional support is the most important thing to treat these individuals.

About The Author
Jeff Dedrick

Do you want more information on anorexia, bulimia, and eating disorders? Go to http://www.bulimiaandanorexia.com for articles and info.

Eating Disorders and the Narcissist

Friday, February 16th, 2007

Patients suffering from eating disorders binge on food and sometimes are both anorectic and bulimic. This is an impulsive behaviour as defined by the DSM (particularly in the case of BPD and to a lesser extent of Cluster B disorders in general). Some patients develop these disorders as a way to self-mutilate. It is a convergence of two pathological behaviours: self-mutilation and an impulsive (rather, compulsive or ritualistic) behaviour.

The key to improving the mental state of patients with dual diagnosis (a personality disorder plus an eating disorder) lies in concentrating upon their eating and sleeping disorders.

By controlling their eating disorders, patients assert control over their lives. This is bound to reduce their depression (even eliminate it altogether as a constant feature of their mental life). This is likely to ameliorate other facets of their personality disorders. Here is the chain: controlling one’s eating disorders controlling one’s life enhanced sense of self-worth, self-confidence, self-esteem a challenge, an interest, an enemy to subjugate a feeling of strength socialising feeling better.

When a patient has a personality disorder and an eating disorder, the therapist should concentrate on the eating disorder. Personality disorders are intricate and intractable. They are rarely curable (though certain aspects, like OCD, or depression can be ameliorated with medication). Their treatment calls for the enormous, persistent and continuous investment of resources of every kind by everyone involved. From the patient’s point of view, the treatment of her personality disorder is not an efficient allocation of scarce mental resources. Also personality disorders are not the real threat. If a patient with a personality disorder is cured of it but her eating disorders are aggravated, she might die (though mentally healthy)…

An eating disorder is both a signal of distress (“I wish to die, I feel so bad, somebody help me”) and a message: “I think I lost control. I am very afraid of losing control. I will control my food intake and discharge. This way I control at least ONE aspect of my life.”

This is where we can and should begin to help the patient. Help him to regain control. The family or other supporting figures must think what they can do to make the patient feel that he is in control, that he manages things his own way, that he is contributing, has his own schedules, his own agenda, matter.

Eating disorders indicate the strong combined activity of an underlying sense of lack of personal autonomy and an underlying sense of lack of self-control. The patient feels inordinately, paralysingly helpless and ineffective. His eating disorders are an effort to exert and reassert mastery over his own life. At this stage, he is unable to differentiate his own feelings and needs from those of others. His cognitive and perceptual distortions (for instance, regarding body image – somatoform disorders) only increase his feeling of personal ineffectiveness and his need to exercise even more self-control (on his diet, the only thing left).

The patient does not trust himself in the slightest. He is his worst enemy, a mortal enemy, and he knows it. Therefore, any efforts to collaborate with HIM against his disorder – are perceived as collaboration with his worst enemy against his only mode of controlling his life to some extent.

The patient views the world in terms of black and white, of absolutes. So, he cannot let go even to a very small degree. He is HORRIFIED – constantly. This is why he finds it impossible to form relationships: he mistrusts (himself and by extension others), he does not want to become an adult, he does not enjoy sex or love (which both entail a modicum of loss of control). All this leads to a chronic absence of self-esteem. These patients like their disorder. Their eating disorder is their only achievement. Otherwise they are ashamed of themselves and disgusted by their shortcomings (expressed through shame and disgust directed at their bodies).

There is a chance to cure the patient of his eating disorders (though the dual diagnosis of eating disorder and personality disorder has a poor prognosis). This – and ONLY this – must be done at the first stage. The patient’s family should consider therapy AND support groups (Overeaters Anonymous). Recovery prognosis is good after 2 years of treatment and support. The family must be heavily involved in the therapeutic process. Family dynamics usually contribute to the development of such disorders.

Medication, cognitive or behavioural therapy, psychodynamic therapy and family therapy ought to do it.

The change in the patient IF the treatment of his eating disorders is successful is VERY MARKED. His major depression disappears together with his sleeping disorders. He becomes socially active again and gets a life. His personality disorder might make it difficult for him – but, in isolation, without the exacerbating circumstances of his other disorders, he finds it much easier to cope with.

Patients with eating disorders may be in mortal danger. Their behaviour is ruining their bodies relentlessly and inexorably. They might attempt suicide. They might do drugs. It is only a question of time. Our goal is to buy them time. The older they get, the more experienced they become, the more their body chemistry changes with age – the better their prognosis.

About The Author
Sam Vaknin is the author of Malignant Self Love – Narcissism Revisited and After the Rain – How the West Lost the East. He is a columnist for Central Europe Review, PopMatters, and eBookWeb , a United Press International (UPI) Senior Business Correspondent, and the editor of mental health and Central East Europe categories in The Open Directory Bellaonline, and Suite101 .

Until recently, he served as the Economic Advisor to the Government of Macedonia.

Visit Sam’s Web site at http://samvak.tripod.com
palma@unet.com.mk

If You Have a Friend with Anorexia Nervosa

Tuesday, February 13th, 2007

It can be very difficult to discover that your friend has anorexia nervosa. It is often tricky to know how to react and what is the best way to approach the subject with them. But it is essential, especially for the newly diagnosed sufferer, that they should have the support and care of their friends so they do not feel alone. If you have no experience of conditions such as anorexia nervosa, hearing your friend recount how it affects them and how they feel about it can be very difficult and unsettling. But your help and support can be very beneficial to them in their fight against the disease. Often if someone has anorexia nervosa and has recently been you diagnosed, it can be very confusing for them. Although they will have realized that they are being careful and as they see it sensible, about their eating, it can come as a great shock when the diagnosis of anorexia nervosa is made. Even if they accept their anorexia nervosa, it does not always help. They can, if told that they will die if they carry on, just accept this and believe that it does not matter what they do as this is going to happen anyway and as such they might as well carry on with their “normal” way of doing things. Its important to realise this illness really does take control of your life which is wy its virtually imposible for somone that has it to get thrugh it themselves. It is essential that you do not reject them when you find out that they are ill. They need all the help and support that they can get, if they are going to beat the anorexia nervosa and get themselves back to a good state of health. People with anorexia nervosa can be very unreasonable some of the time and can say very hurtful things. Although this can be very difficult to cope with, it is worth bearing in mind that this is very often the disease talking. It is a good idea to see it in the perspective of your past friendship and realize that the person that you have had a long relationship with, has not suddenly taken a dislike to you and that they are being affected by their illness. The best way that you can help them, is to remain their friend and give them all the support that you can.

Mayoor Patel has published a best selling book on “The Truth about Anorexia” which can be found at my website which can be found here http://www.BeatAnorexiaNow.com/

Discover and Help Anorexic People By Learning Anorexia Symptoms

Saturday, February 3rd, 2007
Anorexia nervosa is primarily a psychiatric disease, but which has negative effects on the body and can lead to serious problems, even death through starvation in extreme cases when it is not treated. It is a modern-day disease caused by society in general and the fact that nowadays slim is considered beautiful, so, many women, especially the young ones (and sometimes men) refuse to eat and start having eating disorders and lose serious weight. Stress and pressure contribute to the disease’s development.

People suffering from anorexia become thinner each day but to them it’s never enough so they try to get even more thinner which leads to serious physiological problems. They tend to stay away from socialization, because they feel that they are not thin enough and therefore rejected by society and they deny the fact that they are suffering from anything.

Treatment of anorexia nervosa can only be done with the help of family and friends, and it is hard to do because the ill person does not admit that he/she suffers from anything. But, before the treatment the disease must be discovered, and because anorexic people aren’t aware of their condition a diagnose can only be put by someone else who realizes that someone close to him is anorexic. Remember that an anorexic will never come to a doctor alone so it’s up to you to help. Therefore, you should know what are the symptoms of anorexia so that you can detect it and help whomever you discover to be suffering from it.

The first thing that should draw your attention and make you suspicious is that anorexic people suddenly start to loose a lot of weight and they become too thin. If you see that one of your friends has gotten too thin but still tries to lose more weight than that person may have anorexia. This is the basic symptom, that gives the first alarm signal. Afterwards, try to see if that person does a lot of physical exercises. Anorexics keep doing physical exercises to lose weight although they have lost too much already. And they are also obsessed with losing more weight so this is the main thing that they are talking about, diets and weight-losing.

You may also check for other physical symptoms of the illness. For example, women who are suffering from anorexia don’t have a period anymore, which has severe consequences over their body. This may be harder to detect in some cases. The sensitivity to lower temperatures decreases at anorexic people so they may feel cold when the room is cool. Insomnia, mood swings, dry skin, hair problems (either loss of hair, either an increase in body hair may occur, depending on the patient) and finally constipation are characteristic to someone suffering from anorexia. Anorexia also has less visible symptoms like osteoporosis and low blood pressure.

So if you discover that one of the people you know are suffering from this illness seek advice from a doctor as soon as you can until things get worse. Treatment is difficult and long, so the illness must be discovered as soon as possible.

If you want to find great information about many anorexia subjects like pro anorexia, girls with anorexia or many more please visit us at http://www.anorexia-center.com .

Anorexia Nervosa- An Eating Disorder!

Tuesday, January 30th, 2007

Anorexia can be termed or also mean as person who has lost his/her appetite. It can be seen as a form of disease which is very harmful posing a threat to your life. This is a voluntary starving process wherein people kill their desire to eat and end up starving oneself. There are many components which makes this disease complex such as psychological, sociological and physiological. The weight loss doesn’t happen very rapidly but it is a very slow process and looks like any other weight reducing programme in the beginning. But it is after some months you realize the effect it has taken upon your health.

This affects the personality of the person drastically and the outgoing and extrovert person becomes very introvert and subdued. The level of concentration starts depleting too which proves to be big problem for many young people who are the major victims in this disease. The inability to maintain 15 percent of an individual’s normal weight is one of the very serious matters which have to be handled very delicately. Due to starving process there are repeated practices of binge eating and vomiting. Fear plays a very important part, as it the fear of putting on weight, that they discard the idea of being hungry which can also be said as killing yourself gradually and slowly.

The shrinking body is the number one sign you would see in all the people suffering from anorexia. The minimal body weight of the person is also not maintained which makes it very risky for the person. Body doesn’t get enough supplements in the form of vitamins or proteins due to which the nail and hair becomes brittle and the skin without any source of energy turns yellow and pale. In such kind of health, psychologically the person is traumatized, and depression starts kicking in. Due to the shrinking body there is drop in the body temperature which makes the person more vulnerable to cold. Even with the body remaining 1/4 of its size the person suffering with this disorder find themselves to be fat, which can be maintained as a psychological barrier.

The people who are mostly affected with anorexia are mostly girls or women of very young age. The portrayal of abnormally thin women in advertisements and movies as embodiments of beauty has made young women and teenaged girls want to be like them. This alone cannot be considered as the factor determining the anorexic patients. Other factors like eating disorders, genetics, environment, personalities and bio-chemistry. For many anorexia starts off for activities like dance, sports which require a certain body structure. Such kind of disorders also run in families and girls find themselves at a higher risk of getting affected by this disease.

Treatment for such a disease is reversible. Once it is diagnosed the treatment should begin immediately. Most of these cases if detected early, the success rate is good too. Once detected most of these patients are admitted in the hospital and treated accordingly. There is a weight gain program and it takes time depending upon the individual. A set target for food intake per week is assigned which accordingly is increased so as to get the person back on his/her feet, literally. There are different kind of therapies such as normal, group, individual and family. There is lot of emotional baggage for many people who suffer from anorexia and those feeling have to be dealt with, by some psychological sessions or other therapies.

Kevin Pederson has been managing a number of natural home remedies websites which have information on this would help in knowing anorexia and how to fight it out.